Kids

DIY Harry Potter Wooden Figure Set

DIY Harry Potter figures

It’s Harry’s birthday soon, and I wanted to make him something special.  Last year’s matryoshka woodland animals were a huge, if slow-burning hit; one winter’s night we repurposed them as worry-catchers; small animals to capture little worries, and big animals to capture the kind of worries that make it hard to fall asleep; one year on they still line up each night ready for action should they be called upon.

Given Harry’s abiding love of Harry Potter, I decided to have a go at making a set of mini figures that could be housed in a small wooden chest and pulled out each night as we read a few more pages of the book.  Each figure needed to be small enough to be held tightly in a sleepy palm, but large enough to have some careful, magical detail.  My favourites are Harry, Ron and Hermione (oh, and Hedwig of course!)…

Harry Potter Peg Dolls from katescreativespace.com

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For the chest I bought an inexpensive ($5) craft store blank, and then lined it with a copy of the Marauders Map.  All of the characters tuck neatly inside, with room for a few more if I ever get around to it…

DIY Harry Potter play set

DIY box set of Harry Potter figures

Professor Snape was the easiest by far; once I’d worked out his expression, his black robe and slippery, stringy black hair were simple;

Professor Snape from katescreativespace

These took my about a week of pottering and painting in the evenings, and I love how they turned out.  I’ve wrapped each one in tissue paper inside the trunk, ready for  Harry’s birthday.  I still have a handful of peg figures left so I think I might add to them over time; we’ll see!  If you fancy giving this a go (do!), here’s a materials list and some tips and ideas below…

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My materials list:

  • Peg doll blanks were these from Amazon, in men and women styles (try Hobbycraft, eBay or Amazon in the UK)
  • Wooden bank chest from here (similar here for UK shoppers)
  • I like these acrylic paints because the colours are vibrant on wood and mix well together
  • This gold and silver paint pen for accents like Dumbledore’s hat and Hagrid’s buckle
  • All my tiny accessories like the broomstick, books and herb plant are from the Small Wonders range of dollhouse accessories

Tips on painting the figures:

  • I started by giving them all a coat of skin-tone paint.  It saves time to do them all at once and also gives a nice base colour.  Once I’d done that I left the faces alone until the very end (partly due to nerves; the expressions felt like the most important bit!).

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  • I painted Harry, Hermione and Ron’s bodies at the same time, starting with a triangle of pure white for their shirts, then adding a pale grey jumper and pure black robe.  I built up the detail from there, using a cadmium red for the tie and a gold pen for the stripes and accents on their clothing.

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  • Hedwig began with two coats of pure white acrylic, and then I built up the eyes with two large circles of pure yellow, ringed in black, then dotted with black pupils, picked up with tiny spots of white to indicate the sunlight bouncing off them.  Tiny stippling with a grey brush added feathers and down. Finally, I dipped the brush in silver for his furled wings.  The letter he is carrying is a tiny square of watercolour paper with envelope flaps drawn on, dotted with cadmium red to mimic a wax seal.
  • Snape was the simplest of all; a pure white band of collar and then jet-black all over. I used a dark grey for the stripes that resemble pleats to his robe.  The tiny book glued to his front is a leather-bound mini-book from a craft-store, designed to be made into a jewellery charm but perfect instead for this!
  • Dumbledore is recognisable mostly from his flowing white hair and gathered beard and his elaborate hat.  The colours of his outfit are bold and simple, and the detailing on his hat is all done with a gold pen (see above).  The glasses and eyes too are drawn with a fine-tip black marker pen; I decided that even my steady hand was too unreliable for such tiny, important details.
  • Hagrid is recognisable from his wild and bushy hair and beard; I used a very slim brush to capture the waves and curls, and painted on highlights with a lighter shade.  His clothing was surprisingly the hardest because it is so non-descript – hessian and linen in amorphous, vast shapes drawn together with a giant belt.
  • Faces; I used a pale pink colour to stipple on for warm cheeks on everyone but the ghostly Snape, and used a fine black marker pen for eyes and glasses.  Hair I drew on with a pencil and then painted over with a tiny, thin brush loaded with colour.  Classical peg dolls tend to only have eyes so I kept facial features to a minimum; the odd mouth and hint of a nose in places, but no more.
  • The accessories were the most fun bit; choosing books and a Herbology plant for Hermione, and finding a tiny doll’s house broom for Harry.  I also found a miniature silver tray that I will use if ever I get around to painting a Dobby (the Hogwarts House Elf).

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Have a wonderful week!

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The Summer Shoe Project

Welcome back! After a crazy few weeks of work and travel and the general plate-spinning of life, I am at last perched on a chair in the art room once again, able to share a few projects and updates from the summer. Starting with a little child labour..

To fill some of the endless summer holiday time back in July, I gave Harry a small challenge; whenever he was bored he could earn upto £1 for a carefully executed portrait of any of my favourite shoes from the cupboard upstairs.  Each shoe had to be convincingly drawn and coloured, and would be judged before payment was made.   I had no particular expectations of this business opportunity – it was mostly to instil in Harry the principle that pocket-money could be earned, and to keep him doing creative things and not succumb to the lure of screen-time  - but in the end the results were surprisingly lovely…

The Summer Shoe Project

In each case, Harry could choose which shoes to draw; leopard-print kitten heels were an early choice (‘you could wear them on a safari, mum!’)

The summer shoe project

 

blue leopard shoes

 

My favourite beaded heels received a jaunty, flirtatious interpretation and look much more comfortable in Harry’s version than they are in real life;

Summer sandals

Most challenging were these velvet slippers with tiny gold bumblebees embellished onto them (‘It’s tricky to do all of the legs, mum’)…

Summer shoe project

All in all, £9 was earned over the course of a couple of weeks, and rapidly invested in dinosaurs, comics and chocolate.

For my part, I scanned my favourites and pasted them together into a powerpoint slide before printing out – and now have a lovely poster illustrating my shoe collection, ready to be hung on the wall in here!

framed shoe drawingsHave a lovely week, wherever you are and whatever you’re doing.

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Winter Animal Matryoshka

DIY winter animal matroyshka dolls

The nights here are drawing in as the seasons turn, bringing out my hibernating instinct.  The wind and rain and the sudden chill in the air have given the perfect excuse for spending a few evenings over the last week in the art room, radio on and cup of tea in hand, painting a set of nesting matryoshka animals as a birthday present for Harry.  They were a bit of an experiment – the animals morphed as I began painting them, and my technique definitely improved as I went along – but I love them, and I hope he does too…

DIY Animal Matroyshka

The biggest (and friendliest!) is the bear, catching fish for dinner.  Well, it started as a bear, and then my husband saw it. ‘Otter-ly amazing!’ he declared enthusiastically.  So now it’s, well, an otter.  Or an otter-bear.  Harry can decide.

Nesting animal matroyshka; Otter

And then the racoon, with his distinctive bandit eyes, hijacked here by a perky penguin the size of a fingertip (painting matryoshka is a good test of one’s steady hand, hence the tea rather than wine to accompany).

Matroyshka racoon and penguin

And the racoon’s butt, because this is that kind of website.

Raccoon matroyshka

Then Charlie the fox, the first animal I painted.  Somehow this fox is definitely called Charlie, though the others are waiting to be named.

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Then finally the owl, penguin and a tiny, tiny squirrel, wrestling with a nut (the squirrel is hiding inside the penguin here, but you can see her at the top).

Nesting matroyshka

I bought the blank wooden shapes on eBay; they were very inexpensive (about £5) – many craft stores sell them too.  Mine had 6 shapes, with the tallest about 8 inches high and the smallest less than an inch.

DIY matroyshka painting

blank matroyshka

Here’s a few tips I’d pass on if you fancy trying this as a project…

  • When you buy your blank set, play with them a little and check that they pull apart relatively easily.  Some of mine were very stiff and needed light sanding in the join (better to do this now than when you’ve painted and don’t want to touch them).
  • Draw on your design in ordinary pencil, and you can rub it out simply with a normal eraser.  I did this SO many times, often midway through an animal.  it’s very forgiving.
  • I used acrylic paint straight from the tube for all my base colours, then lightened or darkened the shade for accents and shadows.  If you’re hand-mixing colour, make more than you need so that you don’t run out (the wood soaks up a surprising amount), and that you can cover over your supply if you want to call it a day.
  • If you’re making animals like these, try googling them to remind yourself how the noses, ears and limbs work.  It sounds obvious but it’s really helpful when you’re trying to work out how to draw a bear an otter.
  • Plunge in.  I looked at these for days before daring to begin, and then once I did it was easy.  If you make a mistake, paint over it. Bam. No-one will know.

Good luck!

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Holiday Gifting: DIY kids desk art calendar

Each year at about this time I start to think in earnest about Christmas gifts, and Harry and I plan things that we can make for the biggest people in his life; grandparents, godparents… something homemade, for those who love him the most.  This year, we’re making desk calendars made from his favourite drawings and paintings over the last year…

DIY Desk Calendar made from kids art

We chose the pictures together; some done at school, others at home.  I cut a stack of lightweight card into A6-sized pieces and scanned the artwork, adding lovely month-by-month calendar details from here.

Some of my favourites; a still life of our coffee machine and toast rack, the fruit bowl and this year’s sunflowers…

DIY Kids Art desk calendar

…and the one that makes my heart melt, a smudgy drawing that arrived back from school crumpled in a backpack; Harry’s version of Roald Dahl’s BFG.

DIY Gifts Desk Calendar

Some of the artwork is almost a year old, like Penguin Little here – but just too lovely to leave out…

Desk calendar made from kids artwork

I bought a handful of these mini-easels (£1 each!) and removed the canvas, so that the cards could be stacked on the easel and rotated as each month moves to the next…

mini easel

And then we tucked the sets into glittery boxes with an instruction note and lots of festive kisses…

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And now the calendar sets are ready to be gift-wrapped and posted;

all except for one.

Have a wonderful rest of the weekend!

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Altered Books for Little People

 

Making Creative Colouring Books for Kids

It’s that stage of the Easter Holidays where time seems to drag and even Harry occasionally thinks wistfully of school restarting, so we’ve been extra-resourceful this week and have had a go at making altered sketchbooks, inspired by this lovely – and very simple – idea from Rock & Pebble; a kids’ sketchbook shaped like a house, ready to be filled with drawings and pictures.  Aren’t they cool?

Dollhouse book by Rock & Pebble

You can’t buy these in the UK (and at $27, you might just pause anyway), so we thought we’d have a go ourselves and raided Harry’s art cupboard, where I always keep a stash of bulk-buy sketchbooks.  We decided to have a go at making a castle book, so I carefully measured and drew turrets, and used a craft knife and safety ruler to cut them out (metal rulers like these with a finger groove are ideal and minimise the risk of profuse amounts of blood on your castle, however authentic that may look)…

Making altered notebooks

We then took a second notebook and drew and cut out a simple slanted roof, and added doors to each, like so…

Altered notebooks for kids

I had some leftover brick-printed paper from Harry’s knights and castles party last year, so we glued this onto the castle book and added a couple of paper flags for extra style..

DIY Castle Sketchbook

And Harry immediately settled down to colouring and creating, drawing knights, arrows, shields and battles…

Altered Castle Notebook

Castle colouring book DIY Knights colouring book DIY

Yesterday, we decorated the cover of the house book together, adding brick paper, shingle roof tiles and other bits and bobs of decoration.  We love how it turned out…

Harrys House Book customised drawing book for kids

Harrys House Book DIY Colouring book for kids

The inside is still invitingly blank, and our plan for tonight is to take the Ikea catalogue, a pair of scissors each, some glue and a huge array of snacks (it is the holidays after all), and collage a room full of all of our favourite things onto the pages… watch this space!

Have a wonderful rest of the weekend, wherever you are and whatever you’re doing….

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DIY customised drawing books for kids

Toy Passports! (Or, how to take the entire family on holiday…)

Pet Passports!

Last month we set off for Provence laden with just about everything you would possibly need for a short break in the French countryside, and many things you wouldn’t.  We are masters at packing random exotica and hopeless at remembering necessities; this time we were determined not to leave anything behind.

We left before dawn one chilly July morning and had got as far as the airport before disaster struck, as we realised that ALL of Harry’s stuffed toys were still fast asleep in his bed, blissfully unaware that they had been forgotten in the rush. Boris the fox, Marvin the mouse, Wilberforce the polar bear… home alone.  Oh dear.

Harry was temporarily bereft at the thought of sleeping solo, but soon rallied when I promised that next time, we’d make sure they had passports and could take it in turns to travel with us.  Promises made to small people must certainly be kept, so I spent an evening last week forging making passports for this unruly cast of shady characters….

Pet Passports Montage

To make them, I designed a lookalike passport photo page and we asked each gentleman in turn to take a seat and pose for their official photograph.  The rules were carefully adhered to; no smiling, and absolutely no hats of any kind.

That means you, Wilberforce..

Wilberforce

Animal head shots

Some, like Boris, were naturals in front of the camera;

Animal head shots 2

We added the photos onto the ‘passport’ page on my laptop and then printed them out with some blank sheets to make a booklet.  I mocked-up a cover page for each passport and we printed these onto coloured paper to make the covers.

(By the way, for the lovely gold foiled covers, I experimented with a laser printer and gold foil printing technique – I’ll do a step-by-step tutorial soon; it’s fascinating and surprisingly easy – but if you’re desperate to have a go sooner, this link  gives you a very good overview).

And for those making passports for British animals, here are my blank templates for you to download and have a play with…

Toy Passport Cover

Blank toy passport page

We obviously made quite sophisticated toy passports (though rest assured; they certainly wouldn’t fool anyone in authority), but of course you can make these very simply using just craft paper, scissors, pens and glue; Harry enjoyed making these just as much as our computer versions…

How to make passports for your toys

How to make passports for your toys 2

However much time you invest in these, it’s a great way of filling a rainy afternoon with the littles in your house.  You could use stamps and punches to decorate the pages, reflecting a world of glamorous adventures….

Toy passport factory

So now all the animals in our bedroom menagerie have passports (and in fact, I have received a number of black market enquiries from stuffed animals seeking passage from around the world; word has obviously spread that we’re the go-to people for fun-fur illegal immigration).

Now, which to take with us on holiday? Decisions, decisions….

Travelling toys

See you next week!

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Silvered Pebbles; a DIY Garden Game for Summer

DIY Painted Rocks

We’re in the throes of an unexpectedly lovely May holiday weekend, and have been living outdoors, sorting out sheds and pottering in the garden.  I uncovered a stash of old tiles, leftover from bathroom and kitchen projects both here and at our last house.  They looked too pretty to throw away, so I’ve repurposed them to make an outsized, organic version of Noughts and Crosses (or Tic Tac Toe).  I used river pebbles which are smooth and tactile and call out to be stroked and handled, and the set can live outside in all weathers.  If you have a couple of old tiles and a supply of pebbles (mine were from our local garden centre; £5/bag), then this is a very gratifying afternoon project…

DIY Garden noughts and crosses

Playing garden games in summer

Garden games for families

You’ll need:

  • A large tile for the board; slate, granite or marble are ideal.
  • Felt pads to back the tile (optional, but avoids scratching surfaces)
  • Silver paint; I used Liquid Leaf.  Varnish is optional.
  • Masking tape and stencils
  • Pebbles; choose similar sizes, as flat as possible to aid painting and reduce wobble on the board!

First, wash and dry the pebbles and decide on your design.  I decided on stripes and a flower motif instead of noughts and crosses; I used masking tape freehand to mark the stripes on half of the stones, and then simply peeled it away again after brushing on the liquid silver…

step 1

Step 2Step 3

DIY Silvered pebbles

For the ‘noughts’, I used mini cupcake stencils from a local baking shop, and lightly sprayed them with repositionable glue to hold them in place whilst I brushed the paint on.  If you get any small runs or smudges, wait till the paint dries and then simply scratch away the excess with a knife blade; it’s gratifyingly easy to correct.  You can varnish your stones to make them even more hardy; gloss varnish will change the colour of the stone, so have a practice on a spare stone to check that you like the effect first.

Stencilled pebbles step 1

 

Stencilled pebbles step 2

DIY Silver motif pebbles

For the main board I chose a large grey floor tile and measured the gride for nine squares, and marked this in pencil.  I used my masking tape to mark very thin grid lines and then simply painted these in the same way as the striped stones.  You could make them thicker if you like (or even engrave them if you are a master with a Dremel tool (and thus far handier than I…).

DIY Tic Tac Toe for the gardne

Add felt pads to the back of your board (I used these felt coasters for ease, gluing them near the four corners), and place on a contrasting tile if you wish, or simply on a table top or patio.

I used two plank tiles to make platters for the sets of stones; these were wood-effect tiles leftover from the bathroom in our guestroom.  Again, I added felt coasters underneath and then laid out the stones on each; they look rather beautiful..

Decorated silver pebbles Striped silver pebbles

And there you have it… a stylish and fun game to entertain the little people in your life, or simply to look good as the seasons finally turn and al fresco living becomes a reality.  Roll on summer….

Garden tic tac toe

Garden perspective

The Mysteries of Small Boys

The Mysteries of Childrens Pockets

Until very recently, if you had asked me about the mythology of what small boys keep in their pockets, I would have been inclined to dismiss it as literary cliché and nostalgia.  What modern boy, after all,  covets marbles and decrees that random kerbside junk is somehow Treasure?

This one, it seems.

Harry discovered the true magic of pockets – with their seeming infinite capacity for holding Important Things – when he was given a fleece jacket with roomy, zipped pockets on each side.  When I pulled it out of the laundry basket last week ready to wash it, it weighed a startling amount.  Careful emptying of a single pocket revealed the list of treasures above, dictated by Harry as being;

An old fruit gum: “For my snack, if I need energy”

Pebbles: “For my collection”

A golf ball, found in undergrowth the previous weekend and carried around for 5 days: “For Grandma”

Marbles, source unknown: “For a game I am planning about lions”

A single, small Lego piece: ‘I always like to have Lego in my pocket”

Stray feather: “For you, because I know you like feathers and I always collect them when I find them”

Random rubber objects with sequins attached to them: ‘Just in case I need them for something.  And because you like sparkly things”.

Squashed pine cone: “In our game it was the school bell and I was ringing it to mean the end of playtime”

I was struck not only by the sheer magnitude of stuff which he’d collected (and you can imagine the shower of dust, soil and fluff which fell out with it all…), but also the considered evaluation and justification of each item.  They’re currently carefully collated in a shoebox, waiting for the fleece to be dry so that they can be restored to their rightful place.  Or discreetly thrown away.

 

Boys… a wonderful, awesome mystery.

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(p.s. What’s the strangest thing you’ve found in a pocket?  And to mothers of daughters; are girls the same?  )

Recycling Christmas!

Gift tags from Christmas Cards

Possibly the simplest DIY you’ll ever see here – but a timely one!

Do you recycle old Christmas cards by using them to make other things?  it’s a thrifty tradition I remember from early childhood, though the memory of curled and yellowing card trimmed with pinking shears put me off it for a long time.  This year we received some beautiful and fun cards; whilst adults are gradually paring back on card-giving (a combination of saving-the-trees and a lack of organisation, in my house), Harry and his classmates traded cards daily, keen to show off budding penmanship skills and thrilled by the constant flurry of envelopes to open.

Yesterday we took some of them down and had fun making these over-sized gift tags for next year; a way of preserving the beauty of the cards but also of creating tags which are big enough for Harry to write on himself (because no 5yr old can be easily constrained to a tiny square of card), and also a way of refining scissor-skills; Harry busily chopped and snipped his way through a pile whilst I attempted a more measured and symmetrical clipping …

Christmas Card Recycling

I used bits of string and ribbon we’d saved during the frenzy of unwrapping on Christmas Day, and a hole-puncher and eyelets to thread the string through.  We chose the strongest cards as well as the prettiest; they’ll spend a year in the loft and then a few weeks under a tree next Christmas so we wanted to make tags that could last that long.  Also, check that your cards only have writing on the inside ‘back’ of the card and not the back of the image; if they do, you’ll need to just stick them onto another piece of thin card so you cover this up.   A few other tips;

Use ribbon or cord which picks out a colour of the main tag and it really makes them pop!

Colour pop gift tags

Cutting around interesting images on the card cane make some fun shaped-tags, like this pear tree from a larger, square Christmas card…

 

 

Partridge gift tag

Polar Bear Gift Tag

Mounting your cut-outs onto other backgrounds can  make them even more special; I glued this Christmas goose image onto a narrow strip of gold glitter card and then trimmed the corners to make a large swing tag;

Festive Goose Tag

And sometimes cards are so striking that all you need to do is snip off the back and simply make a hole for the ribbon, like this gorgeous graphic print;

Stag Gift Tag

Once we’d finished, leaving a sea of tiny snips of card, drifts of glue and wisps of ribbon fibre, we put all our tags into a leftover gift box and I’ve labelled them ready for next year – a satisfying way to recycle and have fun making things in the process!  Do you recycle your cards? Any other creative ideas for things to do with them? I’d love to hear…

Boxed Christmas Gift Tags

Have a wonderful evening tonight if you’re out celebrating, or simply taking quiet stock in the warmth of home. May I wish you a very Happy New Year for 2015!

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Christmas at Home

Dogs bearing baubles

Today is apparently the busiest day for holiday traffic as everyone heads for home and family in a grand  exodus.  Even though we’re not travelling, the dawn of the weekend does seem to signify the proper start of Christmas and the time when relaxation can begin.  We have family arriving tomorrow to celebrate, so here’s a quick glimpse of how we’ve decorated the house.  Firstly, the friendly stone dogs who stand to attention at our door have abandoned their usual froideur and now bear baubles and festive ribbon, illuminated by the bay trees which are now strung with lights and oversized bells..

Dogs with baubles!

The fir lady has been visited by a flock of robins who peck at her skirts (collective noun for robins, anyone?)..

The fir lady with robins

But aside from the fir lady, I’ve opted for a low-key, calm kitchen with just an oversized paper star to catch the eye from the hallway and distract from the frenetic preparations and clutter on every surface..

Christmas kitchen

In the hallway lies my new addition to our Christmas decor; this year we are honoured to host the North Pole Sorting Office, where every letter sent to Santa from around the world blows in steadily, falling in flurries around Santa’s desk and filling his mailbags to overflowing;

North Pole Sorting Office in Hallway

Santa's mailbag

Santa's mailsack

As fast as the letters arrive, Santa diligently replies to each one. He’s currently busy writing back to Harry;

Santa's Mail Room

His typewriter perches on a ladder, which also holds his reading glasses, special wax seals, bundles of letters and maps and a compass so he can work out where each child around the world is writing from;

North Pole Post Office Detail

(To make this, I printed addresses onto some regular envelopes using different fonts and soaked them in a tray of watery tea before drying on the radiator for an old, worn appearance.  The letters blowing in from above are wired together using lightweight florist wire and hung from a removable adhesive hook on the ceiling. For the letterhead paper, I used this lovely printable and simply added my text to it.)

North Pole Letters

Further down the hallway I’ve arranged a similar tableau to last year (below), with the addition of a basket of magic reindeer food to give to all Believers who cross the threshold and may need a little help to summon the reindeer on Christmas Eve…

Holiday tableau

Magic reindeer food

I’ve hung Christmas cards simply from lengths of ribbon and clips, wired to the base of the bannister poles..

Christmas cards hanging in the hallway

And of course, most importantly all of all, mistletoe to greet all those who arrive…

Mistletoe in the porch

 

We have a real Christmas tree in the Snug, which I’ll share next time along with a few other festive accents.  Now, though, I must sign off as I’ve set myself the challenge tonight of mastering spun sugar to decorate an over-ambitious meringue wreath for dessert at lunch tomorrow.  The wreath has already collapsed after I accidentally turned the oven on again, forgetting it was quietly cooling down inside.  Plan B is to use whipped cream liberally as a distraction…

Have a wonderful weekend!
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The Longest Journey

DIY Winter Animal Parade

A few months ago, I saw a picture on Pinterest of a toy giraffe with a small gift tied on its back and it made me smile, and sparked my imagination; last week I raided Harry’s Ark and created a winter animal parade which is now weaving its way through the snowy  log landscape of our dining table, carrying a myriad of heavy parcels and gifts as Christmas draws ever closer…

Giraffe bearing gifts

Animal Parade

I used some leftover kiln-dried logs from when I filled in our fireplaces, and then wrapped up as many tiny boxes as I could find with brown paper  (far less decorative are the little bowls of staples, matches and paperclips now cover every surface, emptied out temporarily whilst I borrow their boxes..).  Once taped, I tied them with a mixture of butchers string and fine glittery thread, and then carefully secured them to each of the animals.  Harry’s toy wagon also came in handy, and the smallest animals were allowed to perch on top and watch proceedings from above…

Penguins in Animal Parade

I added festive bells, bottle-brush trees and a handful of glittery stars for some additional festive sparkle…

Giraffe with gifts

…and a final scattering of fake snow, which rather caught the meerkat by surprise;

Meerkat animal parade

I used up all of the animals I could find, to make a procession which covers most of the length of our (2m) table, but just one or two would look equally lovely; perhaps as place-settings.  Mine are elevated on logs which are just low enough for easy eye contact and conversation across the table, but again, you could simple set out a tableaux directly on the table itself.

Animal Parade with Gifts

I took these close-up photos above in the conservatory where the natural light is strongest in winter, but you can see here the parade as I began to lay it out in our kitchen, in readiness for throwing open our doors last Sunday to friends for an afternoon of food, drinks and Christmassy fun;

Winter Animal Parade Table Centre

Animal Parade Table Centrepiece

Alas, our festive parade will have to complete its journey soon, as the animals are being continuously depleted by Harry who needs them urgently for various daring missions and the ongoing battle with the Lego men, dinosaurs and Transformers; still, it gives me a reason to create something else for Christmas Day!

I finished work today for the holidays, with a mixture of exhaustion and elation; I’ve developed the hacking cough and bone-tired weariness that always seems to come whenever work abates, but it can’t distract from the smell of the mulled wine now warming, or the fact that two long, uninterrupted weeks of family time and celebration lie ahead; bring it on.

I’ll be back in a couple of days; have a great rest of the week…

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